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Press Conference - Tuesday, Nov. 30, 2010

Media Contact:

Wendy Wiley

425 221-1362

wendy@viecommunication.com

It’s a Girl Leading Diversity in the Boy Scouts

Highest Ranking Female in the Nation Making Her Mark in Seattle


Seattle, WA (Nov. 30, 2010) --  A girl at the helm of the Boy Scouts seems counter intuitive, but it is now a reality in Seattle. It was announced today that Seattle is leading the nation in diversity on two fronts. The most surprising is Sharon Moulds breaking new ground as the highest ranking female in the U.S. and the first woman to lead the Chief Seattle Council, Boy Scouts of America (BSA).

“There are many misconceptions about the Boy Scouts that I’d like to address,” said Moulds.  “I am thrilled to be leading the nation as a proponent of diversity in Scouting and I think it is crucial for parents to know that we welcome youth and parents regardless of race, religion, economic backgrounds or social circumstances.”

The second “diversity first” is Chiem Saeteurn, a young man who has beat the odds as the son of immigrants who escaped a war zone.  Saeteurn is the first product of Scoutreach, a program specifically designed and funded for the most vulnerable youth who live in low-income neighborhoods, are children of recent immigrants or live in homes where a parent is incarcerated. Saeteurn is the first young man to become an Eagle Scout graduate from the program that began in Seattle only five years ago.  “Scouting has been nothing but a thumbs-up for me,” said Saeteurn.  “If I had one wish, I would wish that all boys could be in Scouts, because it changes your life.”

“We are seeing significant growth in diversity and participation in the Scoutreach program,” said Paul Pineda, a Scoutreach Foundation board member. “Many of these families are recent immigrants and have not been exposed to Scouting,” says Pineda. In 2009-2010 the council served 7,074 youth from disadvantaged backgrounds representing an 18% increase over the previous year.

One successful example is the Soccer & Scouting program that specifically targets Hispanic/Latino youth, but 20% of the participants have recently emigrated from other countries such as Eritrea, Somalia, Vietnam and Ukraine. “Combining sports with Scouting has proven to be a great way to reach the increasing immigrant population,” says Pineda.

“Seattle is a role-model for where the national organization must go,” says Wayne Perry, the president-elect of the National Boy Scouts of America and former President of the Chief Seattle Council. Perry will become the highest-ranking volunteer in the U.S. when he becomes president in 2012. “Seattle is like a mini-United Nations. Getting it right here will lead the way for the nation and that’s why we support Sharon’s enthusiasm for diversity.”

Diversity initiatives are familiar to Moulds, who launched the Women’s Resource Group in Chicago to resolve issues resulting in higher retention for women in Scouting.  Moulds hails from the mid-west and her most recent position was as Area Director covering 12 Boy Scout councils in Indiana, Ohio and Illinois.

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National Statistics – Females in Scouting leadership:

Of 298 Boy Scout councils in the country, only five women hold the position of Scout Executive.

Nationally, there are 2,895 professionals, of which 487 (17%) are women.


The Chief Seattle Council, Boy Scouts of America serves over 32,000 young people with more than 10,000 volunteer leaders in five counties around the Puget Sound area: King, Clallam, Jefferson, Mason, and Kitsap. Scouting’s mission is to challenge and strengthen boys and girls in all areas of their lives: physical, psychological, social, spiritual, and vocational.

Links:

Bios of Press Conference Participants

Photos of Participants

Demographic Background info

For Immediate Release

Chief Seattle Council

Boy Scouts of America


seattlebsa.org

Wire Release Dec. 1, 2010

Media Contact:

Wendy Wiley

425 221-1362

wendy@viecommunication.com

It’s a Girl Leading Diversity in the Boy Scouts

Highest Ranking Female in the Nation Making Her Mark in Seattle


Seattle, WA (Dec, 1 2010) --  A girl at the helm of the Boy Scouts seems counter intuitive, but it is now a reality in Seattle, a city known for leading the nation in diversity. Sharon Moulds is breaking new ground as the highest-ranking female in the U.S. and the first woman to lead the Chief Seattle Council, Boy Scouts of America (BSA).

“There are many misconceptions about the Boy Scouts that I’d like to address,” said Moulds.  “I am thrilled to be leading the nation as a proponent of diversity in Scouting. Most people don’t know it, but we even have girls in Boy Scouts of America and I think it is crucial for parents to know that we welcome youth and parents regardless of race, religion, economic backgrounds or social circumstances.”

At the age of 17, Charlotte Heesacker is Moulds prime example of a girl in the Boy Scouts.  The Scout program, Venturing, is geared to be co-ed, where both girls and boys engage in high-adventure activities that tend to be more strenuous than the mainstream. “Climbing Mt. St. Helen’s, kayaking in the Puget Sound and a 5 day bike trip in the San Juan Islands are my favorite adventures so far,” said Heesacker.  “I’ve become a leader with survival skills through the Boy Scouts Venturing program.”

“Seattle is a role-model for where the national organization must go,” says Wayne Perry, the president-elect of the National Boy Scouts of America and former President of the Chief Seattle Council. Perry will become the highest-ranking volunteer in the U.S. when he becomes president in 2012. “Seattle is like a mini-United Nations. Getting it right here will lead the way for the nation and that’s why we support Sharon’s enthusiasm for diversity.”

Diversity initiatives are familiar to Moulds, who launched the Women’s Resource Group in Chicago to resolve issues resulting in higher retention for women in Scouting. Nationally, less than 2% of BSA Scout Executive positions are held by females.  Prior to Seattle, Moulds was Area Director covering 12 Boy Scout councils in Indiana, Ohio and Illinois.


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Links to: Photos for release and Bios

For Immediate Release

Chief Seattle Council

Boy Scouts of America

seattlebsa.org